Influido de Espana

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Nearly 400 years of Spanish rule left an unremovable mark on the Philippines. Spain brought with them all aspects of their culture to the Islands. This includes the Catholic faith, clothing, and dance. The barong tagalog and the terno are Philippine interpretations of Spanish dress made to fit the humid climate of the Philippines. Aside from creating their own versions of European fashion, Philippine aristocrats created Filipino adaptations of European dance as well. These include jotas, fandanggos, mazurkas and waltzes that were danced by young socialites to the stringed music of the rondalla.

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Danza

Danza is a folk dance of Cuban origin which became popular in the late 19th century, also known as habanera or danza habanera. The habanera is a social dance in duple time and performed in a ballroom or on a stage.

The Argentine writer Carlos Vega (1898-1966) traces its origin to the English contra dance or square dance, which was then assimilated into Spain as contradanza or danza. Around 1825, it was brought to Cuba in this form where it was combined with Afro-Cuban rhythms; and around 1850, it was transformed into the habanera.

Danza

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Jota Cagayan
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Jota Cagayana
Origin: Cagayan Valley

The Jota brought by the Spaniards from Southern Spain found its way into many places in the islands. One such jota is named after the valley it adapted. Though Filipinized in many ways that one, Jota Cagayana still displays the fire and fury of its European origin.

Until the turn of the century the Ibanag of Cagayan Valley perform this fast tempo dance which ncludes familiar European steps, the mazurka, polka, gallop and waltz.

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Jota Isabela
Origin: Isabela

A fine example of a filipinized spanish jota, but unlike other jotas this dance does not use elongated bamboo castanets. This Ilocano dance was first performed by the Ilocano settlers of the woodlands of old Isabela.

Jota Isabela

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Pantomina
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Pantomina

Originally a wedding dance from the province of Albay, the dance is now popular at any social gathering.

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Abaruray

Abaruray is a contraction of the words Aba and Ruray. Aba is an exclamation which is equivalent to “Hey!” or “Hi!” in English. Ruray is a nickname for Aurora.

Abaruray
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Jota Manileņa
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Jota Manileņa
Origin: Manila

A dance that originated in the capital city around the 19th century.  Like the other Jotas in Philippine folk dances, this is an adaptation of the Castillian Jota, but the castanets are made of bamboo and are only held, not fastened, to the fingers. It is recognizably Iberian in flavor.

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Habanera Jovencita

A dance typical of a woman’s debut or even her wedding. The accompanying love ballad was written by Maestro Nitoy Gonzales when he was courting Jovita Friese, who then choreographed the graceful and beautiful habanera dance that accompanies it. Jovencita means “young lady” in Spanish.

Habanera Jovencita

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Paypay de Manila
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Paypay de Manila

The young ladies carry scented fans, or "paypay" and flirt with young men with canes and straw hats, once more giving evidence of the Kastilian influence.

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Jota Paragua

A dance originating from Zamboanga, displays steps with very strong Castillian influence, but using Philippine bamboo castanets held loosely. The woman in Jota de Paragua waves a shawl called manton.

Jota Paragua
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Paseo de Iloilo
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Paseo de Iloilo

This is one of the most sophisticated courtship and flirtation dances of the Spanish era. The gentlemen compete among each other to win the heart of the dalaga, or young lady, by exemplifying chivalry, grace, and confidence. One of the most sophisticated courtship and flirtation dances of the Spanish era. The gentlemen compete among each other to win the heart of the dalaga, or young lady, by exemplifying chivalry, grace, and confidence.

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Malaguena

This dance was a favorite dance of the people of Laguana and Quezon during the Spanish Era.

Malaguena
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Source: http://www.likha.org/

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