Ac\;w

INNWA

qippMemac\w

THEIPPAN MAUNG WA

Translated by Min Han, Magwe

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^en>ka; ss\kiuc\;#mi>tQc\ miu;RQaeqaen> `Ps\elqv\'' AlQn\pU`pI;enak\' Rut\trk\ eA;&qQa;el%'' tnlCaen>tv\;''

It was a rainy day in Sagaing. The weather had been extremely hot before it suddenly turned cold. It was a Monday.

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emac\lUeA;ka; Tuien>tQc\ RuM;tk\rmv\kui pjc\;tc\;tc\;RHilH%'' Aim\tQc\ Kp\eA;eA;el; Aip\en' ekQ;en sv\;sim\kel;NHc\. enliueqa\lv\; menr'' RuM;qui>qQa;relqv\'' Maung Lu Aye was feeling rather indolent. He wished he could spend the day quietly at home, lying comfortably in bed and taking things easy. But that was not to be. He had to attend office.

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RuM;erak\eqaAKf ny\puic\wn\eTak\mc\; VI;etak Tuien>ven Ac\;wtMta;VI;qui> ny\lHv\.qQa;rmv\. Ae~kac\;e`para mimimHa qU>lk\eAak\tQc\ Alup\ qc\~ka;enKuik\ `Ps\eqae~kac\. qUNHc\. Tuien>venpc\ luik\rn\ sImM%'' ven4narI RuM;mHSc\;&laKE.%'' Aim\qui>erak\lJc\ AesKM `pc\Sc\Ta;!pI; pssv\;mja;kui rTa;NHc\.tc\ka ny\puic\wn\eTak\mc\;Aim\qui> TQk\KE.elqtv\;'' When he arrived at the office he was told by the Sub-Divisional Officer, U Taw, that they would be leaving for Innwa on a tour of duty that evening. Maung Lu Aye was still under training, and he had no option but to obey the senior S.D.O's orders and prepare for the trip. At four o'clock that afternoon he left the office, and when he got home, he found that his servant had already packed what was necessary for the trip. Collecting his baggage, he left for the S.D.O's residence in a hackney-carriage.

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TuiAim\qui>erak\lJc\ ny\piuc\% /v\.qv\lc\mya;NHc\. qUtui>% qa;el;ts\eyak\pf luik\mv\hu qir%'' Tuilc\mya;tui>mHa Aqk\ARQy\Aa;`Pc\. 40ekja\ 50nI;pf; ny\puic\wn\eTak\mc\;lv\; TuiARQy\pc\'' TuiqUtui>% qa;kel;ka; 12NHs\Kn\> RHieq;%'' ny\puic\mc\;Aim\mH kU;tui>Sip\qui> TQk\lara pssv\;tiu>mHa lHv\;ts\sI;tuik\ ekja\ekja\Kn\> RHi%'' ny\lHv\. luik\qUtiu>ka; /v\.qv\lc\mya;NHc\. qa;kel;' wn\eTak\mc\; 2eyak\' saer; 2eyak\' AesKM 4eyak\ Aa;luM;epfc\;luik\eqa\ tepja\tpf; epja\pQEsa; TQk\qv\NHc\. tUlH%'' on his arrival there, he learned that touring party would include the S.D.O's guests- a married couple and their small son. The elderly couple were in their late forties, about the same age as the S.D.O. himself. Their small son was about twelve years old.

When they left the S.D.O's residence it could be seen that they carried more than a cart-load of luggage. The touring party consisted of the elderly married couple and their son, the two S.D.Os, two clerks, and four servants. Altogether, it was a jolly crowd. It looked like a party setting out on a picnic.

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cf;mins\Kn\>~kalJc\ kU;tui>Sip\qui> erak\%'' rTa;Suik\raNHc\. ersp\mHa kuik\ 100ekja\ekja\ ew;kQa%'' eqac\`pc\@kI;kui ekja\`Pt\& Sc\;relqv\'' pssv\;mja;kui pui;qUkpui;' SQEqUkSQE' Tm\;qUkTm\;' RQk\qUkRQk\' lk\Sc\.km\;qUkkm\;' pc\pn\;mv\.Asa; epja\pf;sra@kI; `Ps\elqv\'' m~kaKc\ !pI;qQa;%'' In less than five minutes they were at the river front facing the landing-stage. The distance from where their hackney-carriage stopped to the water's edge was a little over a hundred yards. and to get down to landing-stage they had to walk across the sandbank. Some carried their baggage on their back some carried them over their shoulders, some perched them on their heads, and some carried them in relays. Far from being an onerous task, it presented a cheerful sight. Very soon the job was done.

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!pI;lJc\ kU;tui>cHk\ 3sI;`Pc\. /rawtI`ms\kui `Pt\& kU;~kelqtv\;'' AKjin\mHa 5narIKQE mui;klv\; PQEPQE' emHac\klv\; Kp\emHac\emHac\' enerac\klv\; mRHi' ss\kuic\;etac\epFtQc\ #P#PePQ;ePQ;eneqa estIASUSUtui>kui emJa\&~kv\.ka ~kv\voisQa PU;r%'' `ms\ermHa sISc\;`Kc\;mRHi'' !cim\qk\Bi%'' sit\~kv\NU;sra@kI; `Ps\el%'' ska;e`pa`Kc\; mRHi~k'' TuiAKjin\kal Tui7an% qayalHeqa A`Kc\;Aratui>kui sV\;sa;ka sit\%Arqakui KMsa;& qQa;~kelqtv\;'' Presently they were crossing the mighty Ayeyarwady in three ferry-birds. The time showed half past five of the clock. It was still drizzling with rain. The evening was a somber gray with the sun hidden from view. In the subdued light of the evening the white spires of the sacred shrines on the Sagaing hills could be discerned in the distance--an enthralling picture of sublime elegance and beauty. Silence reigned over the mighty river which was a picture of indescribable serenity. The scene was quiet and peacefully pleasant. It was one of those evenings when nature was at its best, spreading its cloak of sublimity over all things and filling human hearts with the joy of living. all conversations had ceased, for the pleasantness of feeling the time and the place had provided had made them silent and dreamily appreciative of nature's charm as the ferry-birds glided silently along towards the Innwa river front.

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m~kamHI ts\Bk\km\;`Ps\eqa Ac\;wSip\qui> erak\%'' Tuienraka; Km\;na;`Kc\; mRHi'' /rawtI`ms\km\;tQc\ tv\Ta;eqa A`Ka;RQakel;mja;kE.qui>pc\'' Ac\;w ekac\;sa;sV\kmUka; sv\sv\ka;ka; lUqQa;lUla epfmja;sQa RHieplim\.mv\'' TuiAKf Burc\mc\;`mt\tui> qe`pla;' erla; TQk\~keqaAKf ^enramHpc\ `Ps\eplim\.mv\'' elHpQEqBc\Amjio;mjio; kjc\;pqv\kuilv\; ^enramHpc\ R:sa;eta\mU~keplim\.mv\'' `mn\maelHtp\mja; ss\er;Kc\;kjc\;qv\mHalv\; ^enramHapc\ `Ps\eplim\.mv\'' hMqawtItluic\;mja; Ac\;wkui eAac\`mc\!pI;enak\ ss\kuic\;Bk\qui>kU;ka eRWBui' Kc\VI; AsRiHeqa ny\mja;tQc\ qssaeta\ertuik\rn\ qQa;qv\mHalv\; ^enrakpc\ `Ps\~keplim\.mv\'' TI;nn\;ASk\Sk\ Burc\ASk\Sk\ pjk\sI;KE>elqv\'' /rawtI`ms\@kI;ka; ml:p\mRHa; qQa;!mEtuic\;qa sI;& qQa;enelqtv\;'' Anisstra;kui mlQn\Sn\Niuc\pftka;'' Not long afterwards, they reached the river front of Innwa. There was nothing of grandeur about the place. It looked like any other small village situated on the banks of the Ayeyarwady. During the golden days of Innwa, however, this place must have been very lively with people and traffic busily moving about. In those days when their majesties, the kings, set out in their state barges they may have used this place as their landing-stage. And when they held many a regatta, the boat festivals and boat races, they may have watched the beautiful spectacle from pavilions erected here. Also here they may have staged the practice battle maneuvers of the Myanmar navy. And from this very place also, the Hanthawaddy Mons, after their conquest of Innwa, may have crossed over to Sagaing on their way to Shwebo, Kin-U, and the neighboring areas to make the vanquished drink the water of the oath of allegiance. Successive kings have now perished and passed away leaving nothing behind but decay and ruin here. The mighty river Ayeyarwady, however, is unmoved. It ceaselessly keeps flowing along. How true! Who, and what thing on earth, is not subject to the power of aneiksa (impermanence)?

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^qui> etQ;etaeqaAKf emac\lUeA;sit\TEtQc\ lQm\;rmluilui' eSQ;rmluilui `Ps\mi%'' pflaqUtui>lv\; pssv\;mja;kui AqI;qI; qy\tc\~k!pI;lJc\ lHv\;`Pc\. tMta;VI; buil\tERHiraqui> eSac\yUqQa;~k%'' wn\eTak\NHs\eyak\NHc\. /v\>\.qv\lc\mya;tui>ka; Kp\NuMNuM eta`mc\;rTa;epFtQc\ Kp\mf;mf; qa;na;sQa sI;&la~kelqtv\;'' As he thought of these things Maung Lu Aye could not help but feel a deep sense of nostalgia. the members of the party, respectively, transferred their property on to a bullock-cart, and after that they proceeded to the dark-bungalow at Tada-U. The two S.D.Os and the visiting married couple, however, traveled seated with a great show of dignity on a somewhat disreputable-looking jungle pony-cart.

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Atn\~kalJc\ #mi>Rui;NHc\. kjoM;tui>kui `mc\~kr%'' kjoM;AtQc\;| ermRHi' Kjioc\.@kI;kE.qui> `Ps\enelqv\'' yaKc\;@kI;Bwqui> erak\enrep!pI'' pEKc\;' #ct\Kc\;' nMnMKc\;' e`pac\;Kc\;tiu>`Pc\. `pv\.tc\;sim\;siulJk\ en%'' #mi>Rui;@kI;mHaka; KjoMAup\' KjuMPut\ tui>`Pc\. PuM;lWm\;ljk\en%'' e~qa\ Aniss' Aniss'' After a while the city walls and the moat came into view. The moat was dry and it looked like a gigantic ditch. It now existed in the form of a cultivated field which looked green and luxuriant with plots of leguminous plants, chili, coriander, and maize. As for the city wall, it was now covered with clumps of bushes, big and small. Truly, all this serves as a true reminder of the certainty of aneiksa-- of impermanence.

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`mc\;rTa;kui Atn\kel; emac\;mi`pn\lJc\ #mi>Rui;kui`Pt\ka lUwc\rn\lm\;ts\Kukui `mc\rqv\NHc\. `mc\;rTa;kel;kui lm\;tQc\rp\es& el;eyak\qa; #mi>Rui;kuiekja\& #mi>tQc\;qui> wc\~kv\.~kelqv\'' As the pony-cart drove on, they noticed that there was a footpath, which, through a small gap, led across the wall into the city. Here they made the pony-cart stop. And the four of them went across the wall to see the sights within the city.

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#mi>tQc\;| Tn\;RQk\ka' Tn\;RQk\mui; tEAim\kel;' kui;Aim\ Sy\Aim\Kn\>RHieqa RQaqim\ RQacy\kel;kui `mc\~kr%'' RQaA`pc\tQc\ min\;kel;NHs\eyak\kuietQ>& nn\;eta\tv\ra2ankui em;ra RQamH Kp\lHm\;lHm\;tQc\ emJa\sc\ts\Ku RHieq;e~kac\; e`pa~k%'' TuiemJa\sc\kui ~kv\.rn\ RQakel;kui `Pt\~k%'' eKQ;tsIsINHc\. epja\sra@kI; `Ps\el%'' RQaqU@kI;Ae~kac\;kui em;ra RQaqU@kI;mrHi A`Ka;RQamH RQaqU@kI;k TuiRQakui Aup\Kjop\e~kac\; e`pa~k%'' mc\;en`pv\eta\@kI;mHa RQaqU@kI;pc\ mRHieqa RQaqim\kel; Ae`Kqui> erak\enep!pI'' tky\.Aniss@kI;pftka;'' Within the city walls they discerned a tiny settlement of nine or ten huts whose walls and roofs were constructed of toddy-palm leaves. As they approached the tiny village they came across two girls of whom they asked where the site of the palace was, and they were told that some distance away from the village there was a watch-tower which was still standing. In order to see the tower they passed through the small village. Lively with the notices of dogs barking, it was indeed a rather cheerful place. When they enquired about the village headman, they found that this village had no headman. They were told that the headman of another village was in charge of the place. What a pity it is that once royal city of Innwa has come to such a state that today it exists as a forsaken and insignificant village--an significant village which cannot even boast a headman of its own! How truly illustrative this was of the power of the power of aneiksa!

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TuiRQakel; AnI;Ana;tQc\ Bura;pjk\' ekjac\;pjk\' tn\eSac\;pjk\ tui.kui`mc\r%'' RQasQn\mHen& ~kv\.luik\eqa\ emJa\sc\@kI;kui `mc\relqv\'' Kp\Ruic\Ruic\'' KrI;qQa;Kuik\`Ps\& AnI;Ana;qui> mqQa;!pI' rTa;RHiraqui> TQk\KE.~kelqtv\;'' In the neighborhood of this small village could be seen pagodas, monasteries, and tazaungs (corridors leading to the plinths of pagodas)--all of them in a state of utter ruin and decay. The watch-tower was discernable from the outskirts of the village. It was leaning to one side. Since it was time they continued on their way, they did not go further to get a closer view. Instead, they returned to where the pony-cart was waiting for them.

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rTa;Suik\Ta;ra #mi>rui;A`pc\Bk\tQc\lv\; tEAim\kel; quM;el;Aim\ RHieq;%'' qnp\Kf;pin\;~km\; Riuk\ka TQk\& la~kRHaeqa Apjoikel;NHs\eyak\ka; Aqk\Aa;`Pc\. 15NHs\' 16NHs\Kn\>qa RHi~keq;%'' yKuka; ekj;etaqU kel;mja;qatv\;'' eRH;AKfk emQ;~kpfmv\la; #mi>@kI;qUmja; `Ps\~keplim\.mv\'' rn\kun\' ema\l#mic\' `pv\' puqim\ tui>mHla~kqUtui>ka; ARuic\;Asuic\; ekj;etaqa;etQhU& mTIel;sa; #plup\~kmv\ka; mlQE'' eBac\;BItuitui' BelzaAkCjIPa;Pa;kuiwt\' BQt\Pinp\kuisQp\' VI;Tup\kuieSac\;' lk\kuic\tut\kui hn\pfpfkuic\ka' rTa;kel;na;tQc\ rp\eqa AgClip\eyac\eyac\ tRut\eyac\eyac\' emac\lUeA;Aa; #pM;qluiluiNHc\. ~kv\.~k%'' AKjc\;Kjc\; lk\tui>ka ry\~k%'' emac\lUeA;ka; RHk\tk\tk\ `Ps\qQa;!pI;lJc\ Ie`Nd@kI; @kI;Ta;ka en%'' ny\puic\wn\eTak\mc\;NHc\. /v\.qv\ lc\mya;tui>ka; Tuimin\;kel;NHs\eyak\Aa; pE#Pkel;erac\;rn\ RHiqla;hu em;`mn\;~k%'' Tuimin\;kel;tui>lv\; Aluik\qisQa AnI;Ana; tEkel;mja;tQc\ luik\& em;RHa~k%'' erac\;rn\RHieqatEmH pEts\`pv\kui Sy\`pa;ep;& wy\~k%'' ts\Sy\tn\ Am\;sramRHi (By\RHiNuic\pf.mlE)' cf;kjp\tn\ Am\;sramRHi (laeq;rE>)'' ts\kjp\tn\Am\;sramRHi (Kk\eta.tapE)' cf;mU;`pa; Am\;sramRHi (puik\SMRHa;takui;) AKk\NHc\. etQ>$kMen~krRHa%'' enak\SuM;| emac\lUeA;% Belza Ait\AtQc\;mH pEes. quM;es.r& ep;luik\pflv\; NHs\`pa;eqa piuk\SMkui Am\;rn\ mtt\Nuic\eqae~kac\. TiuNHs\`pa;kui nibban psseyaehatu KE.relqtv\;'' Outside the city wall, near where the pony-cart was waiting for them, were also three or four small huts. The two young girls who came out with a thick make-up of thanakha (paste of sandawood) in the true jungle fashion were, in age, barely fifteen or sixteen years old. Alas! the poor things, they are but country girls now. Had they been born in the olden days, they would surely have been city ladies by birth. But now, those people who came from such large towns and cities like Yangon, Mawlamyaing, Pyay or Pathein will surely look down on these poor people as the uncouth and unrefined people of the backwoods, and will treat them, there's no doubt about it, with very little show of civility, let alone deference.

The two young ladies were looking at the stylish figure of Maung Lu Aye with amuse air as he stood beside the pony-cart. He was dressed in a pair of shorts, a loose fitting blazer, a pair of boots, and a hat; and in his hands he held a walking-stick modishly--and the overall effect was that either he looked like an Englishman or Chinaman. The two village girls covertly drew one another's attention to his appearance and giggled. Maung Lu Aye's reaction to their behavior was one of sudden feeling of self-consciousness, but he collected himself at once to maintain his poise and dignity.

The S.O.D and the visiting couple asked the girls whether they had any pe-byu-lay (white beans) to sell. And the two girls, with unquestionable propriety, were kind enough to go around the nearby huts enquiring if anyone had white beans for sale. From the hut which had some for sale, they bought a pyi for ten pice. They could not change a ten-rupee note (where indeed would so much money come from?). A five-rupee note; still they could not return the change. (Now now, are you pulling our legs!) A rupee note....no change. (A quandary indeed!) A half rupee coin....no change. (Why, isn't money scarce nowadays!) The poor people were in a plight. Even when in the end Maung Lu Aye discovered three anna bits in his blazer pockets and gave them, they could not return the small change of two pince. And so the question of change was settle thus: "Nibbanassa paccayo hotu," as any Buddhist would say, and which being translated means, "May this charitable deed help me onwards to the attainment of Nirvana."

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wy\Kjm\;eqa kiss!pI;lJc\ rTa;kel;epFqui> el;eyak\qa; tk\~k!pI;lJc\ tMta;VI; buil\tERHiraqui> TQk\KE.~k%'' emHac\en!pI'' BakuimH m`mc\r'' ts\Kf ts\Kf Bura;pjk\mja;' tMta;pjk\mja;kui ekja\lQn\& laKE.~kelqv\'' ts\narIKn\>~kalJc\ tMta;VI; buil\tEqui> erak\~kelqv\'' The four of them returned to their pony-cart after the shopping had done, and proceed on their way to the rest-house. Dusk had already fallen and visibility was nil. They went past several ruined pagodas and across a few dilapidated bridges as the pony-cart headed towards their destination. About an hour later, they reached the dark-bungalow.

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ny\puic\wn\eTak\mc\;k Ac\;w#mi>tQc\;qui> wc\~kv\.Kjc\qv\ e`paeqae~kac\. enak\ts\en> venKc\; ema\eta\ka;@kI;NHc\. qU@kI;mc\; epfk\& laelqv\'' el;eyak\qa; ema\eta\ka;epFqui> tk\~k%'' Tuiema\eta\ka; ka; Puid\. ema\eta\ka;tv\;'' ema\eta\ka; epFsk erak\laeqa ema\eta\ka; `Ps\hn\tU%'' nMpft\k 1000 ekja\ekja\mJqa `Ps\elqv\'' zradubbl ARQy\qui> kjen!pI`Ps\eqae~kac\. cy\Rup\mepF' kuiy\eta\ts\KuluM; pin\qv\.enrak pin\' yuic\qv\.enrak yuic\' kjio;qv\.enrak kjoi;' pE.qv\.enrakpE. tky\.ka;ehac\;@kI; `Ps\elqv\'' sk\kui N:i;&TQk\qQa;`pn\pflv\; tgjot\gjot\ tgjk\gjk\NHc\. tlm\;luM; `mv\tm\;& qQa;%'' yc\;% AsQm\;ka; lHv\;NHc\.qaqa RHi%'' ema\eta\ka; RHa;eqa 2an `Ps\eqae~kac\. Tuika;Aiu@kI;kuipc\ kel;mja;`Mmc\lJc\ ATU;ASn\;lup\ka wuic\;AMu~kv\.RHa~k'' e`p;luik\qUk e`p;luik\'' eKF`pqUk eKF`p'' epja\sra. epja\sra@kI; `Ps\elqv\'' lHv\;AnI;Ana; `Pt\qQa;`pn\lv\; NQa;mja;k ln\>RHa~k'' ema\eta\ka;epFtQc\ luik\pfqQa;qUUtui>mHalv\; Ie`Ndrr /ramsv\;sim\rHc\ qUe7;tui>kuipc\ gu?\#pic\Kjc\eqa sit\mja; epFepfk\& la~k%'' The S.O.D told the headman that he wished to see the sights within the city of Innwa. Accordingly, the next evening, the headman arrived in a big car. And the four of them climbed in. It was an old Ford, most probably one of the earliest models to be imported into Myanmar, for its registration number barely exceeded 1000. Since the car had already reached old age, the appearance of youth was sadly wanting about it. It was truly a battered old vehicle; a weather-beaten veteran of roads. Parts of its body were broken, and bits of it missing. The body stood awry on its four wheels. It was beyond doubt one of the oldest of motor-cars.

And when the engine was started, it moved, but as if under duress. For it shook, and it groaned, and made the most awful noises all along the way. Its pulling power and speed barely exceeded that of a bullock-cart. Since it was one of those places where hardly any motor-car is to be seen, even this old trotting-jalopy was a sight enough to excite the curiosity of the poor children of the locality, who, filled with excitement and wonder, gathered round to have a look at the wonder of the roads. Some of them came hilariously racing after the car. And some of them excitedly called out to their friends lest they should miss the hilarious spectacle. It was indeed a mirthful occasion for them all. And every time the jalopy rushed past a bullock-cart, it invariably frightened the poor beasts out of their wits. As for the four passengers, their sense of well-being had been boosted to such a degree that they felt like VIPs. Why, their pseudo-affluence had made them feel so well-off in life that they were lure into vying with those who lived in the lap of luxury.

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qui>NHc\.pc\ Ac\;wqui> erak\~kelqtv\;'' erak\lJc\ el;eyak\qa; ema\eta\ka;mha`Pc\. epja\pf;sQa #mi>Riu;@kI;kui ekja\katk\~k%'' eRH;ASk\Sk\k ewftui> yaV\tui> lHv\;rTa;' `mc\;mja;' Sc\mja;`Pc\. wc\~k TQk\~kelqv\'' yKu cftui>ka; ema\eta\ka;pjk\`Pc\. Kp\qQk\qQk\@kI; #mi>AtQc\;qui> wc\relqv\hU& kuiy\sIkuiy\cH eqQ;@kI;ljk\ en~k%'' And so they reached Innwa at last. The four of them were happy and gay as they drove through to the city across the great wall in their old car. During the golden age of Innwa, for purposes of transport, they may have made use of palanquins, carts, carriages, horses, and elephants when entering or leaving the city. "But we, the fortunate ones, are now entering the ancient city in a fast old jalopy," they told themselves vaingloriously.

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m~kamHI Aut\ekjac\;`PO`PO@kI;qui> erak\~kelqv\'' AtQc\;qui> wc\~kv\.~k'' @kI;klv\;@kI;' Kuic\klv\;Kuic\' KM.klv\;KM>' Ac\mtn\>ekjac\;@kI; `Ps\elqv\'' pjk\sI; yuiyQc\;`Kc\;mRHi' pkti Kuic\KM.ljk\pc\'' ekjac\;Tuic\Bun\;@kI;ka; bla'' lc\;Nui> lc\;wk\ tui>`Pc\. kin\;eAac\;ra 2an@kI; `Ps\ljk\enqv\'' lc\;Nui>tui>% AnM>tui>e~kac\. nMesa\esa\ RHilH%'' ekjac\;eAak\ ekjac\;`pc\ !pE!pEsc\eAac\ wc\luiwc\' TQk\luiTQk\' tk\luitk\' Sc\;luiSc\;' Kp\`pc\;`pc\;pc\ lHm\;KE.~kelqv\'' After a while they stopped at the white brick building of monastery. They went in to see what it looked like within. It was a massive building, durable and imposingly grand in appearance. In fact, it was a first-class monastery building. There was no sign of ruin or decay about the whole structure. It was still in an excellent condition. There was, however, not a single soul to be seen there, no presiding monk. The monastery was sans monk of any kind. It was now the abode of bats and night herons. The air within was foul with the smell of bats. The four sight-seers went all round the monastery leaving no place unexplored, within or without. They went up stairs and down stairs, entered through one door and came out of another, and all this they did at a leisurely pace.

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Tui>enak\ AnI;Ana;tQc\RHieqa zrp\' ekjac\;' Bura;tn\eSac\;mja;qui>lv\; lHv\.pt\~kv\.~k' PU;emJa\~kNHc\. eta\eta\pc\ AKjin\eNHac\;KE.~kelqv\'' KjoMkQy\eneqa Bura;lv\;RHi' NQy\pt\eneqa Bura;tui>lv\; mRHa;' pjk\`pa;enqv\tui>klv\; AeTQeTQ ertQk\&pc\ mkun\Nuic\'' After that they went round looking at the zayats (rest-houses for pilgrims and wayfarers), monasteries, pagodas, and tazaungs (corridors leading to the plinths of pagodas) located in the neighborhood, enjoying the sights and worshipping at the shrines. In this manner quite a considerable time was spent there. There were pagodas galore in that place. Some of these were hidden under overgrown bushes, some were covered with creepers crawling all over them, and there were numerous others which had fallen into utter ruin and decay. In fact one could hardly keep count of them.

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TQk\laKE.~k`pn\%'' yKc\ my\Nu Aut\ekjac\;@kI;%erH> mnI;mew;tQc\ Srayudqn\kui ATim\;AmHt\#pka suik\TUTa;eqa ekjak\tuM;@kI;kui `mc\& !KMAtQc\;wc\ka ~kv\.~keq;%'' Tuienraka; Ac\;wlk\mRQM> eTac\enratv\;'' `mn\maNHc\. AgClip\tui> pTmss\ `Ps\~kka Srayudqn\ AsRHieqa Nuic\cM`Ka;qa;tui>Aa; mqkCa& eTac\qQc\;AkjV\;Ta;`Kc\; `Ps\%'' Srayudqn\mHa AgClip\qkkraz\ 1824 KuNHs\mH 1825 KuNHs\ATi ts\NHs\tuic\tuic\ TuieTac\tQc\; enrelqv\'' They departed from that place. Not far from Queen Mai Nu's white-brick-monastery (mentioned above), and facing it, was the fence-in memorial stone erected in commemoration of the American missionary, Dr. Judson. They entered the enclosed area to have a look. This was the sight of the notorious Let-ma-yoont Prison of Innwa. During the first Anglo-Myanmar War Dr. Judson and other foreigners who were held suspect had been imprisoned here. Dr. Adoniram Judson (theologian and lexicographer) was kept a prisoner from 1824 to 1825 A.D., for a period of one whole year, in that prison.

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yKuka; eTac\AeSak\AVI AsAnkuika; m`mc\' enrae`m`pc\kuiqa `mc\r%'' TuiAKuik\tQc\ eRH;ehac\;`Ps\pjk\puM Ae~kac\; eTac\AtQc\; AkjV\;KMKE.r~keqa qUtui>% dukKAe~kac\;mja;kui sV\;sa;miq`Pc\. tra;r~k%'' emJa\sc\@kI;qui> TuienramH mew;eta.!pI'' Anv\;cy\qQa;lJc\ erak\eta.AM.'' qui.eqa\ emHac\lu!pI'' lHv\;lm\;Atuic\; TQk\larmv\`Ps\& lm\;m`mc\k Kk\mv\'' Tui>e~kac\. TuienramH KQaKE.~kqtv\;'' Now, however, there was not a vestige of the prison building left to be seen. The site where the building had once stood was now a barren ground. Maung Lu Aye's thoughts drifted back to dwell and reflect on the laws of the moral world and just retribution; back to the times when the historical events took place long ago, to visualize the sorrows and sufferings of the prisoners during those troubled days...

Not that far from this place was the old watch-tower. It could be reached within a short time. However, since it was getting late, and since they would have to be driving along the cart-road, it would not do to linger till it got dark. And so they made their departure from that place.

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lHv\;lm\;Atuic\; TQk\KE.~kra lm\;TEtQc\ ema\eta\ka; pjk\~kmla; pjk\~kmla; hu te~kac\.~k~kNHc\.pc\ lm\;m@kI;epFqui> erak\r%'' As they drove back along the cart-road, they were kept bothering by one perplexing worry: "Would it break down and fall to pieces, would it break down?" And their anxiety was not dispelled till they reached the main road.

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Tui>enak\ Atn\kel; qQa;mi`pn\lJc\ ba;kra ekjac\;tuik\qui> qQa;eqa lm\;KQEqui> erak\%'' lm\;m@kI;mH `mc\enrep%'' wc\~kv\.Kjc\eqasit\mja; epFepfk\la%'' ema\eta\ka;emac\;qma;Aa; ba;kraekjac\;tuik\ RHiraqui> Aemac\;Kuic\;~k%'' lHv\;lm\;`Pc\. qQa;r%'' lm\;mHa Kjioc\.' kjc\; TUTp\qv\ te~kac\;' PuMAepfc\; TUTp\qv\k ttn\' nguihn\ Kp\pjk\pjk\mui> ts\wk\Kn\> qQa;milJc\ kuiy\eta\`mt\ ema\eta\ka;mHa mqQa;pE `cc\;Sn\ka Atc\;KMenqtv\;'' After that, as they proceeded onward they came to a branch road which led towards the famous Bagaya Monastery. The monastery was visible from the main road. And they were filled with a desire to visit the place. They told the driver to drive them over to the monastery. But the road leading to the monastery was another cart-road. For one thing, the road was full of holes and ditches. For another, it was a road covered with a thick layer of dust. And what with the state of its constitution when the car had wended but half the way, it put its foot down and refused to budge an inch further.

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ema\eta\ka;emac\;qma;k Anv\;nv\; APuMPuM sMulc\eAac\ sm\;eqa\lv\; #PMetac\m#PM tun\l:p\Pui> ew;sQ'' qv\AKfkjmH AepFk AqI;qI; Sc\;~k!pI;lJc\ K?t#Pt\ tQn\;& Tut\~krelqv\'' ^qiu> ema\eta\ka; yaV\pjMk gu?\KMqv\.AtQk\ ba;kraekjac\;tuik\NHc\. nI;rk\NHc\. ew;KE.rpfe~kac\;''

qippMemac\w

gNTelak' 1293 Ku kSun\l''

 

The car-man made use of all the knowledge at his disposal to restore its equanimity, but it stood its ground. It was now hopeless trying to make it move. Its passengers then got down to coax it on by pushing it for a while. But the proud old veteran of a car had had enough. It refused to have to do anything with them. And so, although they had come to within easy reach of it, they had to turn back without having visited the famous Bahgaya Monastery.

THEIPPAN MAUNG WA

Translated by MIN HAN, Magwe